Fitness According to Dog

Warning: doggie focused post below <3 

We made it through Monday! How’s your week starting out? Mine is going okay. We had a BIG win yesterday in our little household: Juno was back to full activity at her doggie daycare! Let’s just say, it’s left her a little tired.

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As some of you may know, Juno’s been out of commission for a third of her life due to genetic knee issues. Since May 2015, when Juno was diagnosed with a luxating patella, our lives were turned upside down. Our happy, active puppy would intermittently go lame, to the point we would have to carry her around, but for the longest time, vets didn’t know what was wrong (they thought it was something wrong with her foot).

When she finally growled at me in pain, I knew she needed to see an orthopedic surgeon. Thankfully, there is a PHENOMENAL clinic in California, that got me in the next day for a consult, and surgery the day after. Everything happened so fast.  It was one of the scariest things I’ve ever had to deal with as an ‘adult.’

Suddenly, this dog had to go from jumping, running, and playing to confinement to a space smaller than most bathrooms. She had to watch her sister play and snuggle while she had to lay separately. Perhaps hardest of all, she wasn’t able to sleep with us for fear she would jump up on the bed and tear out her implant. It was such a hard transition, as for anyone who’s struggled with an injury.

The crazy thing? She listened. This puppy followed instructions and rested (mostly). I’m not sure if she was listening to her body or me but she was 90% good. Yes, she played with her sis or tried to sprint during our walks but overall, she rested, allowing her body to heal.

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Three months later, this little nugget was back to playing, loving on her sister, and moving to Texas. We were so happy to watch her enjoy life again

Until we weren’t. After we’d been in Austin for two and a half weeks, Juno tore all the soft tissue around her ‘good’ knee, requiring an emergency room visit and surgery ASAP. It was the worst possible timing-another post for another time. Regardless, she was a trooper and dealt with another surgery, like a champ.

Now, why does this matter? Why does her return to full activity even matter for us humans?

It’s a great reminder that we need to be cognizant of listening to our bodies!

  • Even today, you may expect a pup to go full gusto into being able to play again. Not the case. Juno paced herself, laying down in the middle of sessions to rest.
  • She’s ‘going to bed early,’ taking it easy as she re-enters her activity.
  • She’s listened to professionals throughout the recovery process, letting her know to take it easy as she moves towards her full self.
  • We’re working through muscle building exercises to be sure that she doesn’t have muscle imbalances.

Thanks for bearing with me with this ‘silly’ post. I hope you got some insight out of this.

Let me know your thoughts. How have you recovered from an injury? What’s your best practice?

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