7 ways to lose weight without counting calories

Counting calories, tracking macros, and measuring servings used to be my jam. I started counting calories when I was thirteen years old, so in a sense, I grew up with calorie counting. It was the first way I tried losing weight, making it my go-to in the past. At the same time, I knew it was inherently unsustainable and unhealthy. It made me obsessive and a little crazy. Even when I’d try to stop counting calories and follow a serving based system, I counted servings nonstop. I’d carry a notepad with me everywhere, counting, and recounting everything I ate. I believed if I stopped, I would eat with abandon and gain 20lbs overnight. I was trapped and honestly believed counting calories was the only way. Thank goodness there are other ways to quit counting calories, feel in control of your eating (I’ll teach you my favorite way here), and still get great results. 

I talk with women every week who come to me frustrated that they can’t stay consistent with their nutrition without getting obsessive. They absolutely hate feeling tethered to their MyFitnessPal app and constantly calculating their daily intake but don’t know what to do when they aren’t counting.

No more, lovelies.

Today, I’m sharing 7 of my favorite ways to lose weight WITHOUT counting calories or getting obsessive.

7 ways to lose weight without counting calories

I talk with women every week who come to me frustrated that they can't stay consistent with their nutrition without getting obsessive. They absolutely hate feeling tethered to their MyFitnessPal app and constantly calculating their daily intake but don’t know what to do when they aren’t counting. No more, lovelies. Today, I'm sharing 7 of my favorite ways to lose weight WITHOUT counting calories or getting obsessive.

Eat vegetables at every meal

By adding veggies at every single meal, we fill up with fiber and micronutrients. This leaves less space for us to eat crap. If getting in your 5+ servings of veggies per day is a struggle, try out my best tips. 

Drink more water

We commonly mistake thirst for hunger, so being hydrated helps us stay consistent and even lose weight. I personally aim for 1/2 my bodyweight in ounces of water per day, in addition to the 16-24oz I drink during/immediately after working out.

Log your food for three days

We’re often tempted to count calories or track macros but can get better results from the basic awareness that comes with a food log. Writing down the foods we eat for a three day period can help us understand how food makes us feel physically.

Eat more protein

I love protein, because it keeps us feeling satisfied and helps stabilize our blood sugar over long periods of time. If we try to eat some protein every time we feel hungry, we’re less likely to binge or turn to starchy carbs. Win win.

Let yourself get hungry

After dieting and counting calories for so long, sometimes it gets really scary to allow ourselves to feel hunger. That said, letting ourselves get hungry before we eat is the best way to get more in-tune with our bodies and also reduce the total amount consumed in a day.

Sleep for at least 7 hours per night

There is SO much research that sleep is connected with body composition. Sleep affects our hunger hormones, cravings, and insulin sensitivity. Read: when we’re overly tired, our bodies CRAVE more of the processed, high carb/high fat foods. [Precision Nutrition has an awesome article if you want more info]

So when we are trying to lose weight, stop counting calories, and automate our eating, sleep is imperative.

Aim for 8-10k steps per day

Low intensity steady state cardio (aka walking/movement) can be a game-changer when we’re trying to be less obsessive AND change our body composition.

So many of us work desk jobs and are sitting most of the day. Even if we are exercising daily, this little bit of extra movement can help bust us through a plateau.

 

What’s helped you lose weight or work towards your goals without getting obsessive?

How to stop counting calories (without anxiety)

When we try losing weight, our default is often to start counting calories. We feel that if we can stay within the numeric constraints of a calorie counting plan, we’ll reach our goals no problem. Sure, counting feels good for a while, maybe we start to see some quick results or we like the feeling of control that comes with knowing exactly what we’re eating.

But what about when we’re ready to stop?

This is where the problem lies.

I talk to women all the time who are obsessed with counting, tracking, and measuring their food. They absolutely hate feeling tethered to their MyFitnessPal app and constantly calculating their daily intake but don’t know what to do when they aren’t counting. They’re so overwhelmed by their food diaries but can’t take a break for fear of gaining weight. As soon as they try and stop counting calories, they’re overcome with anxiety and fear.

I’ve been there, too. I started counting calories when I was thirteen years old, so in a sense, I grew up with calorie counting. And when I tried to stop counting calories and follow a serving based system? I counted servings nonstop. I carried a notepad with me everywhere, counting, and recounting everything I ate. I felt like if I stopped, I would eat with abandon and gain 20lbs overnight.

My friend, there IS an alternative.

I’ve come across tons of resources out there to help us stop counting calories but nobody addresses the mental side: how do we give up the control that comes with counting? That’s where I come in.

Three steps to STOP counting calories (without stress)

Stop changing other things

When we begin thinking about changing our calorie counting habit, it’s often our default to pair it with something else. Why not change all the things, stop counting calories, cut sugar, stop drinking, and do a Whole30 in the same month?

I get it, lady. That’s my default too. I hate change, so I will often pile on about 7 changes at once (see the time I graduated college, moved out of my parents’ house, moved in with Andrew, and started working my first full-time job all in the same week). I was so confused why my relationship was tense and I was feeling drawn to restrictive eating habits again. If it were possible, I’d go back and slap 22-year-old-Katherine across the face.

When we multiple things change, we cling to the familiar.  

So for 22-year-old-Katherine, restriction was safe and familiar amidst all the crazy amounts of change happening in my life. Even though I hadn’t restricted myself for ages, it became 1000x harder not to deprive myself because it was safe.

And this is exactly what happens when we try to stop counting calories while also changing up other variables in our nutrition or fitness.

It’s 1000x harder to stop counting calories when it’s the familiar habit. 

So, when we try to stop counting calories, I do not want us changing up our nutrition or training–for better or worse–while weaning ourselves off the calorie habit. If we are trying to stop counting, everything else should remain unchanged.

This makes things so much easier and lessens the anxiety that comes with giving up the control of the numbers.  It will also free up our mental energy to move away from the calorie counting habit.

Focus on the MACRO view

No, no, not that macro, lovely. I’m talking about taking the birds-eye, overall, or large scale view of your diet. When we count calories, we get so focused on the micro, minute details. When we’re ready to stop counting, it’s also time to zoom out.

No more stressing about grams of sugar. It’s the end of only eating foods that are less than 10% fat. We don’t have to skip out on a snack because we’ll go over our calories.

Instead, we’re going to zoom out and focus on the high impact, BASIC habits that really matter when it comes to our nutrition.  I want to make it super simple. Instead of counting anything, I want us to focus on just two things: protein and veggies. Every single time we eat, grab a portion of protein and some vegetables. If we’re still hungry, add some healthy fat or complex carbohydrates.

Want more help getting in veggies at every meal? Grab some of my best tips.

This super simple strategy makes all the difference, because we’ll be eating lots of nutrient dense and non-calorie dense foods. This will allow us to eat more AND make sure we aren’t missing out on any key nutrients. In layman’s terms, low calorie density = large portion size. And large portion sizes keep us (me) happy. If you want to learn exactly how I’ve automated my eating and stopped obsessing, join my tribe. I share my best stuff with these ladies. You can sign up in the box to the right.

Go one meal at a time

As calorie counters, we tend towards that all-or-nothing mentality. We see things in black and white, so why would our approach to stopping calorie counting be any different?

Because it has to be.

Looking at our journey to #CeaseConstantCalorieCounting as either “counting” or “not counting” forces us to view things in black and white. And it’s this black and white mentality that makes us stressed and anxious, isn’t it?

So, instead, I go meal-by-meal when I’m helping ladies get consistent and stop counting calories, because this gives us flexibility. This process works for two main reasons:  (1) we accumulate little wins, helping us stay consistent and (2) it lessens the feeling of losing control.

Week 1 may look a little like this:

Monday-Wednesday: count breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks

Thursday-Saturday: count breakfast, lunch, and dinner

Sunday: count breakfast, lunch, and snacks

Then, by week 2, we’ll try dropping to even fewer counted meals:

Monday-Wednesday: count breakfast and lunch

Thursday-Saturday: count breakfast OR lunch and snacks

Sunday: try only tracking one meal

If at any point, we start feeling overly anxious, we simply return to the previous step. Within a few weeks, counting calories becomes a thing of the past.

I hope these strategies help! Let me know if you have questions!

Have you tried to stop counting calories? What helped you?

Three ways to stop stressing about food

Hey lovelies! I hear from women all the time that their #1 struggle is eating well without getting obsessive. We know what we “should” eat but we can’t seem to implement it. We either restrict ourselves and feel super deprived or we get overwhelmed by all the “shoulds” and eat whatever we want, leaving us feeling lots of guilt. (If you’re overwhelmed by constant food guilt, grab a copy of my #ConsistentNutrition Cheatsheet right now).  Either way, it’s super effing stressful to constantly think about what we “should” eat.

We’ve all been there, right?

Back in my calorie counting days, I’d carry around this little black notebook to calculate my daily intake. Each choice I made was meticulously planned to fit into the specific overall calorie count. If eating a chocolate Clif Bar would make me go even 10 calories over my daily limit, I’d pick a different, less satisfying flavor to remain under my goal. I’d wait as long as possible before eating breakfast to “save” calories for later.

It was an exhausting way to live, making it inherently unsustainable. With lots of experimentation, I’ve found these three super straightforward ways to detach from stressing about every bite we eat.

How to stop stressing about food (in three steps!)

I hear from women all the time that their #1 struggle is eating well without getting obsessive. Here are my top three ways to stop stressing about food.

Stop counting

I know, I know. This is super counter intuitive (and many of us struggle with giving up the control counting calories gives) but it’s SO important to stop stressing about food. When we stop counting, analyzing, and measuring everything, we free up mental space to focus on other non-food relating things.

Instead of counting calories constantly, we’ve got to automate our eating so we no longer have to think so much about it. I want us to make it super simple. Instead of counting anything, I want you, my friend, to focus on just two things: protein and veggies. Every single time you eat, grab a portion of protein and some vegetables. If you’re still hungry, add some healthy fat or complex carbohydrates, depending on your goals.

Wine, Protein, Veggies

Want more help getting in veggies at every meal? Grab some of my best tips.

This super simple strategy makes all the difference, because we’ll be eating lots of nutrient dense and non-calorie dense foods. This will allow us to eat more AND make sure we aren’t missing out on any key nutrients. In layman’s terms, low calorie density = large portion size. And large portion sizes keep us (me) happy. Follow along on Instagram and Facebook with #mindthemiddle and #ConsistentNutrition to see how I implement these strategies day-to-day.

I talk with women all the time who are struggling to stay consistent with their nutrition. They know what they “should” eat but they can’t seem to implement it when outside of their normal routine. They either restrict themselves and feel super deprived or they get overwhelmed by all the “shoulds” and eat whatever they want, leaving them feeling lots of guilt.That’s why I created my #ConsistentNutrition Cheatsheet to help all of us implement the things we know we should do with our nutrition. There are no crazy meal plans or calorie counts, just the handful things you need to implement daily to eat moderately and find that middle between restriction and guilt. 

Also, if you’re struggling to give up that control, tracking meals by taking photos a couple times a month helps my clients SO much.  As humans, creatures of habit, most of our daily intake is the same day-to-day, so tracking a couple times a month is sufficient.

Add more protein

Once we’ve lessened or eliminated counting, it’s time to turn our attention to the foods we’re eating. Just by implementing certain food habits, we can lessen our thoughts about food! This is where protein comes in.

Protein is my favorite macro, and just about every woman I speak to is not getting close to enough! By focusing on protein, we fill ourselves with quality fuel, helping us feel super satisfied for hours after our meals. When we aren’t hungry all the time, we can stop obsessing over what to eat next.

Protein:

  • Keeps us feeling full for longer
  • Takes more energy to break down than carbohydrates or fat (burning more calories)
  • Is a building block for important molecules in your body, like hormones
  • Helps regulate blood sugar and hunger pangs

So what’s the next step?

I recommend eating protein every single time you eat. If you’re still hungry, cool, grab some more food. But starting with protein is going to improve your satiety, decrease cravings, and help you stop thinking about food all the time. If you need suggestions on what to eat, check out my top 5 protein foods.

Plan your indulgences

For those of us with disordered eating backgrounds, indulgence is tough. We either feel like we should restrict or count every bite that goes into our mouths or we’re indulging at full speed. This always made me afraid of indulging at all, because I felt like I couldn’t stop. And when I did indulge? I felt insanely guilty later. I thought I had to feel guilty or restrictive; those were the only two options. If you are sick of feeling guilty or restrictive when eating, my #ConsistentNutrition Cheatsheet will help you navigate the middle between guilt and restriction. Grab your copy now.

I created my conscious indulgence framework to specifically guide and plan our indulgences.

There are two parts:

Daily indulgences: these are indulgences that are part of our daily routine. We indulge daily because this makes indulging way less taboo. This helps us stop stressing about what we’ll eat, because it’s part of our routine. These daily indulgences are small, things like a few malt balls, some wine, or maybe a handful of chips.

The second part is the conscious indulgence. A conscious indulgence is an indulgence you specifically plan and are choosing. This may be something a little bit bigger or more substantial but it’s always consciously chosen. We would use these indulgences when we’re out to eat and we’re making tougher nutrition decisions. So, when we walk into a restaurant, we already consciously choose how to splurge and how we’ll stay more consistent with our goals. This gives us the willpower to pick healthier options to fill the rest of our plates. Win, win, and win(e).

This framework has changed my relationship with food and has drastically reduced my food stress. And that’s why I’ve put together an entire implementation guide in my #ConsistentNutrition cheatsheet. Click this link to learn more and grab your copy.

Show me what YOU choose to indulge, both daily and consciously, in with #myconsciousindulgence.

I hope these help! Try out these three ways to stop stressing about food and let me know what you think!

Do you stress about food?

How to stop falling off the healthy eating bandwagon: 80/20 rule

Want consistency with healthy eating and exercise to be second nature? Follow this system.

Since starting at Google three years ago, efficiency has been the focus. Because of this emphasis on productivity, every time I start a new project, I ask myself the same question: how can I optimize for the 80%?

Why does this matter?

Optimizing for the straightforward 80% frees us to focus on the more challenging (and impactful) 20%. 

[Source: The Pareto Principle]

In any given problem, about 80% of cases will be standard. If we can identify that simple 80% and automate a process around them, we no longer have to work on them. As an example, maybe you work in customer service and you get 100 requests per day. If 80 of them are on the same topic, you can very easily automate a response or create a help center article to answer the question. Once you resolve the 80 simple requests, you can spend time working on the more complicated ones in your inbox. Win win.

On the other hand, because the remaining requests are more complex, they’ll make up the majority of your efforts and outputs. You’ll need to focus more intensely and come up with customized solutions for each one.

By the end of the day, 20% of your requests generate 80% of your work. And if you can automate that 80%, your day becomes a heck of a lot easier…and more efficient.

This sounds appealing, doesn’t it? Because we all want to focus our energies on the things that really matter, the 80/20 rule (or Pareto’s Principle) can be applied to so many areas of our lives. And as a nutrition coach, I’ve realized the importance of using the 80/20 rule in my coaching to help women get even more consistent with their nutrition.

Why apply the 80/20 rule to nutrition?

The 80/20 rule makes us more consistent with food and nutrition.

About two years ago, I signed up for my first online bootcamp. After battling with anorexia for 8 years at that time, I really wanted to change my physique: more muscles and less belly fat (don’t we all?).

I was SO excited. I took my initial progress pictures, gathered all my equipment, and got ready for week 1. But as soon as I opened the nutrition guidelines, my stomach sank. The portion suggestions, calorie counts, and macro breakdowns were incredibly overwhelming.

As I cooked my chicken breast with vegetables on Wednesday of week 1, all I wanted was a glass of wine. In that moment, I was overcome with a feeling of failure and sunk to the floor in tears. All of the counting and measuring made me so obsessive that I again was battling with my ED.  As I leaned against the cabinets in my tiny kitchen, tears streaming down my face, I realized I couldn’t do this. I couldn’t make myself abide by crazy restrictive guidelines without slipping back into ED. So by the next week, I stopped following all of the bootcamp nutrition guidelines to keep myself from getting overly obsessive, restrictive, or super guilty.

If we struggle with ED tendencies or food obsession, the 80/20 rule is the answer. It allows us to focus on the things that really matter, while automating the rest.

Let’s break it down.

Struggling to be consistent with food? Apply the 80/20 rule to your nutrition and get consistent once and for all.

In order to use the 80/20 rule, we’ve got to consider two things: the 80% and the 20%.

Handling the 80: #automatethatshit

When it comes to the standard 80%, we’ve gotta automate. To automate our eating, we create behaviors that are SO automatic that we don’t even have to think about them.

My first suggestion to start automating your nutrition is to be BASIC and focus on the essentials of good nutrition. Instead of counting anything, we focus on just two things: protein and veggies. Every single time we eat, grab a portion of protein and some vegetables.

This super simple strategy makes all the difference, because we’ll be eating lots of nutrient dense and non-calorie dense foods. This will allow us to eat more AND make we you aren’t missing out on any key nutrients. In layman’s terms, low calorie density = large portion size. And large portion sizes keep our bellies happy.

After doing this for a few weeks, we stop thinking about it and the behavior becomes automatic.

We can all use a little help making our eating more automatic, especially in tough eating situations.

Consistency with healthy eating and exercise is really tough. As a personal trainer and nutrition coach, I have women emailing me almost every single day who just can’t seem to stay consistent with healthy eating and exercise. They know that eating healthy and exercising are “good for them” but have a hard time implementing what they “should” do when life is crazy, their schedules change, or their motivation wavers.

Before automating my eating, I ate well all week long but by Friday, I’d overdo it on boozy beverages and treats. All weekend long, I’d feel guilty and disappointed in my lack of willpower. Now, I eat consistently every single day, without feeling anxious about my indulgences.

Consistency with nutrition is hard. We often know what we need to do but implementing it is another story. There are days when we’re really good and days when everything is off. Sometimes nutrition is effortless, but other times, it gets so overwhelming or we get sick of making decisions, so we end up overindulging and feeling guilty later. When these things happen, we feel like there’s no middle ground between restriction and guilt.

But there is.

With lots of experimentation, I found a way to cut to the middle between deprivation and guilt. That’s why I created my #ConsistentNutrition Cheatsheet to help all of us implement the things we know we should do with our nutrition. There are no crazy meal plans or calorie counts, just the handful things you need to implement daily to eat moderately and find that middle between restriction and guilt. Grab your copy now.

Handling the 20: #mindthemiddle

Now comes the fun part: the tough (and impactful) 20%.

When we’re outside of your automated nutrition, we do not restrict or aim for perfection. Instead, we focus on moderation and minding the middle.

To mind the middle, we take each eating situation and pick the moderate option.

As as example, maybe breakfast, lunch, and dinner are automated but that after dinner snack is still tough. In that case, we’d pick an option that’s not the best but also not the worst. Instead of having a bowl of ice cream or nonfat plain greek yogurt, maybe we grab some Halo Top or my chocolate mug cake. 

Is it the best option? Heck no. But it’ll also keep you satisfied and less obsessed with your next treat.

Part of why I love using the 80/20 rule in my nutrition coaching is that it inevitably shifts us away from obsession. When we’re no longer counting, measuring, or analyzing everything that goes into our mouths, what we eat occupies SO much less mental space.

Wanna try it?

Consistency with nutrition is hard. We often know what we need to do but implementing it is another story. There are days when we’re really good and days when everything is off. Sometimes nutrition is effortless, but other times, it gets so overwhelming or we get sick of making decisions, so we end up overindulging and feeling guilty later. When these things happen, we feel like there’s no middle ground between restriction and guilt.

But there is.

And I want to teach you with my #ConsistentNutrition cheatsheet. Don’t miss this. 

If you’re looking for more examples of how I #mindthemiddle,  I’ll be posting on Facebook and Instagram about how I stay consistent during all situations my eating using the hashtag #mindthemiddle. Don’t miss out!

What’s one nutrition question you have?

Two reasons I won’t take a cheat day

When we open Instagram, and look at any fitness accounts, images of cheat days prevail. We all know taking a cheat day is all the rage right now. It seems like every fitness model, personal trainer, and workout enthusiast posts pictures of deep fried oreos or juicy cheeseburgers every other week. The cheat day has become so popular that it seems like everyone’s doing it. With so many people tracking macros, counting calories, and eating out of tupperware, a cheat day starts looking pretty good.

We may look down at our standard lunch of a salad or a sandwich and wonder if we need a cheat day too. Truth is, choosing a way of eating is a completely personal decision, and I’m a little biased, my friends, but I don’t believe that nutrition strategies should require you take days off, even if St. Patrick’s Day is around the corner.

There are two main reasons I won’t take a cheat day.

Cheat days have become SUPER popular. But this is why I won't take a cheat day. Ever.

Cheat days encourage restriction on all other days.

When we’re living the cheat day lifestyle, it becomes a big no-no to indulge on any other day. If it’s not a cheat day and we find ourselves craving a piece of chocolate, what are we supposed to do?

Sangria sorbet cheat day

We can eat the chocolate, feel guilty, and beat ourselves up. Or, we restrict ourselves and wait until the next cheat day on our calendars. Neither of these options sound good to me.

halfway cooked chocolate mug cake

With my history, the cheat day mindset perpetuates an unhealthy relationship with food. While I haven’t ever fully given into the cheat day lifestyle, I used to have a similar mindset when it came to drinking. Drinking was not okay on weeknights. I’d only let myself have something to drink on Fridays or Saturdays (well, and sometimes Thursdays cuz I was sooooo close). So on that random stressful Tuesday night, after we’d both had super long days, I’d watch Andrew grab himself a beer without a second thought, and I’d weigh my options and make deals in my head.

I worked 11 hours today, I deserve a Mike’s Harder Lemonade.

If I have a Mike’s Harder today, I’ll skip the pasta with dinner.

Maybe if I run for another 20 minutes tomorrow, I can have one. 

I couldn’t understand how he could make this decision so easily.  It was effortless, carefree, and easy. He didn’t go back and forth, debating the ramifications of enjoying a single beer on a Tuesday night. If he wanted one, he had one. I, on the other hand, beat myself up for even wanting a sugary can of Mike’s Hard Lemonade.

See, when we only allow ourselves to indulge or enjoy our food on specific days, it gets way too easy to restrict ourselves and making certain foods off limits.

That’s a big part of why I reject the concept of cheat days: they encourage restricting yourself.

But truthfully, there’s a whole other reason you won’t catch me posting about my cheat day escapades.

I don’t actually NEED a cheat day.

My nutrition strategy has indulgence and mini-cheats built in, every single day. This keeps me from wanting to eat the entire cheesecake. I’m content after a few bites.

IMG_5040

I no longer restrict myself from eating foods (and drinks) I enjoy. I’ve stopped trying to eat “perfectly.” In fact, if I can look back at a day of eating as perfect, I did something wrong! I ask myself just one question, and this guides how I eat every single day, regardless of where I am.

Is it possible to stay consistent with your food wherever you go?

Learn to stay consistent with your nutrition so you no longer need cheat days.

I talk with women all the time who are struggling to stay consistent with their nutrition. They know what they “should” eat but they can’t seem to implement it when outside of their normal routine. They either restrict themselves and feel super deprived or they get overwhelmed by all the “shoulds” and eat whatever they want, leaving them feeling lots of guilt. They feel trapped between restriction and guilt. It doesn’t have to be this way. With lots of experimentation, I found a way to cut to the middle between deprivation and guilt. That’s why I created my #ConsistentNutrition Cheatsheet to help all of us implement the things we know we should do with our nutrition. There are no crazy meal plans or calorie counts, just the handful things you need to implement daily to eat moderately and find that middle between restriction and guilt.

Grab a copy of the FREE #ConsistentNutrition Cheatsheet.

Look, my friend, I don’t want you to struggle with obsession and restriction anymore. It sucks and is crazy stressful. Our mental space is so much better utilized outside of the food and exercise realm. To take one step closer to that #cheatdaynotneeded lifestyle, let’s try something different this week: try giving ourselves one indulgence per day. See how it feels. By the time our cheat day comes along, we may not even need or want it.

Have you taken a cheat day before?

{wedding ready workout} my go-to core workout

I’ve always been slightly obsessed with my abs. I’ve tried every exercise, piece of equipment, program, and core workout touted on the internet. When I was still on my quest for a six pack, I did Tony Horton’s Ab Ripper X video at least three times a week. I’d roll out my yoga mat in my dorm room (cuz we def can’t do 300 sit ups on linoleum) and get to work. Every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday I was sure to do this routine. At the end of each core workout, I’d shyly look at check my stomach in the mirror for results. And each time, I would be disappointed by the lack of a chiseled six pack.

Even though I don’t necessarily want a six pack anymore (see why!), having a strong, lean midsection is important to lots of us, especially during wedding season.

As we’re inching closer and closer to wedding season, I’ve created my Wedding Ready workout series to help my friends, teammates, and clients get ready to rock their wedding dresses. Over the last few weeks, I’ve put together three exclusive real time workouts to get you wedding dress READY.

In case you missed the first few workouts of the series, check them out here:

Upper body workout: perfect for shaping your back, shoulders, and arms

Lower body workout: special emphasis on your glutes and quads to build strong, shapely legs 

This week, we’ve got the last workout in the series: core! But let’s be real, this is not your typical six pack sit up workout, because I’m all about results. And in order to change your physique, we’ve got to incorporate both effective ab exercises to build strength AND interval cardio to reduce body fat [source 1, source 2].

If that seems like a lot, no need to stress. We’ve got it all in today’s workout.

Your wedding ready core workout

Today’s core workout is exactly how I like to structure my HIIT cardio workout days: sprints and core work. To get the absolute best results possible, we want to do both parts of this workout together. If you need to split up the parts of the workout, don’t stress too much, hit the core workout portion. Just make sure you work a sprint session into your weekly routine.

Before you begin, I highly suggest you do a substantial warm up (like this one). By activating your core, you ensure that it’ll work hard throughout both parts of the workout. Even without the core workout portion, if you sprint hard enough, I guarantee that you’ll feel your abs the next day!

Part 1: sprints!

Head to a track, treadmill, or hit the pavement to complete the following intervals.

Looking for a new core workout? This ab workout will get you wedding ready in no time. And, let's be real, this is not your typical six pack sit up workout, because I'm all about results. And in order to change your physique, we've got to incorporate both effective ab exercises to build strength AND interval cardio to reduce body fat.

Part 2: core workout

When you complete your sprints, it’s time to work that core. We’ve got five super effective ab exercises, with 10 reps each. Go through this super short circuit 2-3 times!

Looking for a new core workout? This ab workout will get you wedding ready in no time. And, let's be real, this is not your typical six pack sit up workout, because I'm all about results. And in order to change your physique, we've got to incorporate both effective ab exercises to build strength AND interval cardio to reduce body fat.

When you smash your workout, be sure to tag me on instagram and facebook so I can cheer you on 🙂 If you enjoyed this workout, you’ll LOVE my free weeklong fitness challenge. If you’re looking to jumpstart your fitness goals, there’s no better time than now!

What kind of workout do you want to see next?

How often should we eat for weight loss?

Today, my friends. I am dispelling one of the most common nutrition myths out there. You know what I’m talking about if you’ve ever done any research about dieting or losing weight.

If I want to eat for weight loss, I should eat every few hours.

Beachbody coaches everywhere tell their clients to never let themselves get hungry. Thousands of free diet plans float around the internet provide options for your six small meals per day. This belief is so widespread that if you ask anyone how you should eat to lose weight, they’ll tell you to eat often so you never overeat. They’ll spout some fact that eating every couple hours stokes your metabolism and helps you burn more fat.

How often should we eat for weight loss? Should we really eat 6 meals a day? I'm answering these questions once and for all.

Sounds awesome, doesn’t it?

I hate to break it to you, my friends. There is absolutely no scientific evidence (I searched!) out there that eating every few hours is better for weight loss. When it comes down to it, your body burns the same number of calories breaking down your food you eat regardless if you eat three meals or seven.

With that in mind, it’s super important to figure out an eating schedule that works for YOU. Determining how many meals to eat is a process of trial and error, because it’s all about creating habits that are easy and natural for you! 

Over the last year, I’ve switched from eating every couple hours to eating four larger meals per day. This change has helped me make progress towards my fitness goals and automate my eating. My friends, I will NOT be going back, because it’s made me super consistent with my food, regardless of where I am. Today, I’m sharing WHY I’ve made that shift but If you wanna learn exactly how I’ve found consistency, I’m sharing handful of things you need to implement daily to eat moderately, completely stress-free here.

Why I eat four meals per day

It promotes satiety

Back when I subscribed to the idea I had to eat often to stoke my metabolism, my meals were super small. And let’s be real, small meals=hungry Katherine. When you eat mini-meals, you never feel like you ate enough. You know the feeling, you finish your chicken and broccoli but you feel like you can and should eat more.

Bleh. I hate that feeling.

So, when I started eating four meals a day, spaced out by 4-6 hours, I had to start eating bigger meals. And guess what? I loved it! As I added more protein and fat to my meals that nagging feeling of “I want to keep eating more even though my plate is empty” went away.

Now, I feel satisfied for hours after each meal, which is awesome after living in a constant state of hunger for years. 

It decreases my daily caloric intake

Wine, Protein, Veggies

When I first started trying to eat for weight loss, I tracked my macros to ensure I got everything I needed. At first, I was worried I’d start gaining weight because I was eating “more.” But what I found was pretty surprising.

I was eating less than before!

After doing a bit of research, I found this is actually pretty common! When you’re eating six times a day, you end up eating more than you think. Snacks turn into mini meals and your mini meals tend to be a little bigger than they should be.

Confining my eating to four times a day has helped me keep my calorie intake within healthy ranges, even when I’m traveling or eating out.

It gives me flexibility in my social life

Eating six meals a day can make social situations more difficult. Sure, you can grab happy hour and pick at a side salad but how satisfying is that? Oh, and you’ll need to eat again in two hours, so don’t hang out for too long. With an eating schedule that includes bigger meals, your life doesn’t have to revolve around your food.

It’s so nice to be able share meals with my friends and loved ones again without worrying I’m eating too much.

I hear from women all the time that they have a hard time eating on the go. Drive-thru’s, happy hours and travel can botch even the best intentions for healthy eating. SO, I put together this super simple cheatsheet for dining out and how to stay consistent with your nutrition wherever you go. No crazy meal plans, just the handful things you need to implement daily to eat moderately, completely stress-free. Grab a copy of the FREE #ConsistentNutrition Cheatsheet here.

Now, even though eating four meals a day works super well for me, please don’t take this as a one size fit all approach. Do some experimentation! You may do best on three bigger meals, and that’s totally okay! If you want to find a way of eating that works for YOU, I’d love to work with you on your nutrition goals. If you’re ready to make some changes and reach your nutrition and fitness goals, let’s chat!

How many meals do you eat daily?

Should you compare yourself to other women?

You walk into the gym ready to crush your workout. You’ve got your favorite leggings on, a fun t-shirt, and you’re on top of your game. After a brief warm up, you walk over towards the weight rack (because you’ve already mastered the weight room), pick up the 10lb dumbbells, and start your workout. But that’s when the social comparison starts. You look to your left and see some super fit chick with cut arms doing more push ups from her toes than you thought possible. And to your right? That runner chick on the treadmill is sprinting at a speed of 12mph. You didn’t even know treadmills went that fast!

She can do so many more push ups than me. 

She’s so much stronger/faster/fitter than me. 

 

Or maybe you’re out at happy hour with some friends, you look around and see so many beautiful women in their cocktail dresses. You can’t help but notice how well they are rocking their outfits. They look so happy, pretty, and confident. So, the questions start.

Why can’t I have her arms?

Why am I not that confident?

Sound familiar? We’ve all been there. I know I’m not alone. It’s almost impossible to stop comparing ourselves to others, whether it’s your best friend, a stranger, or someone in a magazine. But the truth is, after doing some serious research, I’ve found that social comparison is much more than the thief of joy, and it NEEDS TO STOP.

Why social comparison doesn’t serve you

This is the #1 reason you need to stop comparing yourself to others. RIGHT NOW.

Comparing yourself to others seems to have absolutely no positive effects. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. It seems that if you you engage in social comparison, you are very unlikely to successfully eat intuitively. When researchers studied a group of teenage girls over a one year period, they found that social comparison was the strongest NEGATIVE predictor of subsequent intuitive eating [source]. Read: if you’re comparing yourself to others, you’re going to have a damn difficult time getting to that intuitive eating happy place. You know, that place where you eat based off of internal hunger and satiety cues instead of skipping meals to keep yourself skinny or eating because a plan tells you it’s time.

Social comparison is also shown to be a key contributor to feelings of shame [source]. When all you’re doing is looking at others and judging yourself, sometimes you can’t help but feel inferior. It’s that inferiority that leads to shame, “the most powerful, master emotion” (at least according to Brené Brown).

Why you should care

…because this affects us all.

When I was in middle school, I developed a bit faster than all my friends (I was the same height at thirteen as I am now at twenty five). I looked around and thought something was wrong with me.

Why was I so much fatter than my friends? 

Why were they so much more confident than me? 

And it wasn’t just me that noticed how different I looked.

I remember one afternoon, swimming at my friend Katie’s house in January. We thought it would be fun to jump into the cold water but I didn’t have a bathing suit. She looked through her drawers and pulled out two swimsuits: a bikini and a one piece.  I’ll never forget what happened next.

She turned to me and said, “You should wear the bikini, you know, because you have more fat and you’ll stay warmer than me.”

Even twelve years later, I remember the pain in the pit of my stomach. It was like she had punched me.

I frankly hated myself.  The shame, anxiety, and fear that came with comparing myself to my friends and the images I saw in magazines definitely contributed to my  10+ year battle with anorexia. Because I felt so inferior, I didn’t see any other way out, besides trying to change my body. I thought, if I could just look like them, I will feel better. The weight fell off so fast but the shame didn’t go away so easy.

Social comparison is a dangerous fallacy. It’s a romantic idea right? If we can just be as pretty/smart/strong/capable as she is, we’ll be happy/better/satisfied. My friend, believing this will fail every time. There’s only one way to true joy, and that’s living as your authentic self.

Today, my friend, I challenge you to help me end this social comparison. Stop comparing yourself to the woman standing next to you. Own what makes you different from her instead! Stand tall, strong, and in your power. This will bring you the joy, love, and happiness you’re really looking for!

Tell me something unique and amazing about YOU!

{wedding ready workout} my TOP lower body workout

We’re inching closer and closer to wedding season! I don’t know about you but tons of my friends and teammates are getting married in spring/summer 2017. With their weddings around the corner, getting ready to rock their stunning wedding dresses is top of mind. I get it!

That’s why I decided to create my Wedding Ready workout series. I’m putting together three exclusive workouts to get you wedding dress READY.

A few weeks ago, we worked our upper bodies, because many popular wedding dress styles emphasize the bride’s back, shoulders, and arms. But this week, you’re in for a treat, because I’ve put together a Wedding Ready lower body workout, with special emphasis on your glutes and quads.

Having strong, shapely legs is super important for those form fitting wedding gowns (or just for rocking shorts next summer). 

But, in order to make serious changes to our legs, we’ve gotta get some weight involved. Because our legs and butt are our biggest muscles, it’s important to add additional weight when you’re doing a lower body workout. This maximizes our results and ensures we’re not wasting time in the gym.

Your Wedding Dress Ready Lower Body Workout

For today’s lower body workout, we’ve got two 10 minute AMRAPs. The first AMRAP is bodyweight and plyometric. I wrote this circuit to raise our heart rates and get us nice and warm. This cardio primer of sorts will prepare you to lift heavier weights in AMRAP 2.

For today's lower body AMRAP workout, we've got two 10 minute AMRAPs. The first AMRAP is bodyweight and plyometric. I wrote this circuit to raise our heart rates and get us nice and warm. This cardio primer of sorts will prepare you to lift heavier weights in AMRAP 2.

You’ll complete 10 reps of each exercise in AMRAP 1, resting only as needed. Repeat as many times as you can in ten minutes.

Rest for 1-2 minutes before moving into AMRAP 2.

Most importantly? Have fun with it! This one is definitely a toughie, and if you workout with me real time, you’ll see me struggle.

This lower body workout is similar to the quick, effective workouts in my free weeklong fitness challenge. If you’re looking to jumpstart your new year’s fitness goals, there’s no better time than now!

What kind of workout do you want to see next?

3 steps to eat out AND stay consistent

Eating out. It’s religion for some and an enjoyable pastime for all. Let’s be real. We all love to do it. Tasty, convenient, fun, and a break from the standard, day-to-day routine. Even though it’s a lot of fun, eating out doesn’t always help us reach our nutrition goals. Restaurant foods can be much higher in fat, salt, and other additives that we wouldn’t normally add to our home cooked meals [source]. And don’t even get me started on restaurant portion sizes.

But guess what? As a personal trainer and nutrition coach, I plan on eating out around once a week, even when I am working on fat loss goals.

When reading most of the personal trainer/nutrition coach perspectives out there, eating out often becomes the devil. But I’ve actually found a way to eat out, enjoy life, AND still get results. Oh and I’m sharing it with you.

For all of 2016, I spent my time commuting between California and Texas. Always on the go and rarely feeling settled, I turned to restaurant options more often than I’d like to admit. Even though I was “eating well” most of the time, I was over-indulging (hello wine 7 nights a week) and paying the price. At first, I definitely noticed changes in my energy levels, body composition, and mindset.

But, after tons of trial and error, I’ve come up with three simple steps to guide my restaurant eating.

3 steps to eat out without breaking the calorie bank

When reading most of the personal trainer/nutrition coach perspectives out there, eating out often becomes the devil. But I've actually found a way to eat out, enjoy life, AND still get results. Oh and I'm sharing it with you.

1) Break down every menu into components.

When we look at menus, we can often feel overwhelmed. There are so many items and none of them look like our meal plans. Instead of shaking our heads, calling it a wash, and ordering a “cheat meal,” start dissecting that menu. Figure out what’s listed and narrow it down to the healthier options.

If I’m struggling, I start by looking in the salad and entree sections. Usually, I can find some sort of salad with grilled chicken, and I’ll use that as a starting point, doctoring it up to my tastes.

A couple suggestions to get start right now:

  • Pick proteins that are baked or roasted. This gives good flavor without tons of fat.
  • If you’re a vegetarian, make sure your item has a protein source.
  • Choose carbs based on your goals. If you’re aiming for fat loss, ask for a double serving of veggies and skip that potato.

2) Choose protein and veggies that’ll satisfy you

Once you’ve narrowed down the menu, stop counting macros, analyzing portions, or counting in any way. Instead, focus on getting lean protein and veggies on board. Ask for substitutions if they’re needed! Nbd.
My favorite way to do this is head to the entree section of the menu. Find a protein that sounds tasty, then ask for double veggies instead of the carb. Often, restaurant meals are made up of protein + lots of carbs & fat + a little veggies. Instead of stressing about finding an entree that is exactly what I’m looking for, I pick the protein I want and change up the rest of the plate. By the time I’m done ordering I’ve got protein + lots of veggies + a little bit of carbs/fat.
These options will maximize nutrient density without the extra calories you’ll find in the starchy sides and will actually leave you feeling satisfied for longer.

3) CHOOSE every indulgence

Instead of eating and drinking everything in sight, be mindful about your indulgences. Often, we feel we deserve something special when we’re eating out. However, truth is, you ALWAYS deserve something awesome. Still, if you want to indulge, be thoughtful about it & make it a conscious decision. Be aware of what you choose to indulge in.

For those of us with disordered eating backgrounds, indulgence is tough. We either feel like we should restrict or count every bite that goes into our mouths or we’re indulging at full speed. This always made me afraid of indulging at all, because I felt like I couldn’t stop. And when I did indulge? I felt insanely guilty later. I thought I had to feel guilty or restrictive; those were the only two options. If you are sick of feeling guilty or restrictive when eating, my #ConsistentNutrition Cheatsheet will help you navigate the middle between guilt and restriction. Grab your copy now.

I created my conscious indulgence framework to specifically guide our indulgences. It makes indulgence part of every single day–without going overboard. So, when I walk into a restaurant, I’ve already consciously chosen how I’ll splurge. This gives me the willpower to pick healthier options to fill the rest of my plate. Win, win, and win(e). Show me what YOU choose to indulge in with #myconsciousindulgence. I’ll be posting throughout the week on the topic so don’t miss out.

I talk with women all the time who are struggling to stay consistent with their nutrition, especially when eating out. They know what they “should” eat but they can’t seem to implement it when outside of their normal routine. They either restrict themselves and feel super deprived or they get overwhelmed by all the “shoulds” and eat whatever they want, leaving them feeling lots of guilt.

I’ve been there. For years, I went out to dinner or happy hours only to order the lowest calorie option. I’d crave something tasty but knew I *should* order something light, so I ordered grilled chicken with roasted vegetables. I’d feel pretty good about myself…until appetizers came. Sweet potato fries, meatballs, and bread with pesto dipping sauce would fill the table. I’d try resisting…for about five minutes. Eventually, I’d always give in, indulging in fries, meatballs, bread, and lots of wine. Even though I knew what I should do, I couldn’t. I was too bored by my choices to stick with them, so I went overboard and felt super guilty afterwards.

Consistency with nutrition is hard. We often know what we need to do but implementing it is another story. There are days when we’re really good and days when everything is off. Sometimes nutrition is effortless, but other times, it gets so overwhelming or we get sick of making decisions, so we end up overindulging and feeling guilty later. When these things happen, we feel like there’s no middle ground between restriction and guilt.

But there is.

With lots of experimentation, I found a way to cut to the middle between deprivation and guilt. That’s why I created my #ConsistentNutrition Cheatsheet to help all of us implement the things we know we should do with our nutrition. There are no crazy meal plans or calorie counts, just the handful things you need to implement daily to eat moderately and find that middle between restriction and guilt.

Grab your copy now. 

Do you enjoy eating out?